Wheel of Emotions

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Wheel of Emotions

Postby Sabina » Thu Jun 16, 2011 8:45 pm

~~~This is basically a reference post, which may be handy in other conversations.~~~

The wheel of emotion consists of 8 basic emotions and 8 advanced emotions each composed of 2 basic ones. The wheel was created by Robert Plutchik in 1980.

Basic emotion
Joy
Trust
Fear
Surprise
Sadness
Disgust
Anger
Anticipation
Basic opposite
Sadness
Disgust
Anger
Anticipation
Joy
Trust
Fear
Surprise
Image


Wikipedia wrote:Emotion is the complex psychophysiological experience of an individual's state of mind as interacting with biochemical (internal) and environmental (external) influences. In humans, emotion fundamentally involves "physiological arousal, expressive behaviors, and conscious experience." Emotion is associated with mood, temperament, personality and disposition, and motivation. Motivations direct and energize behavior, while emotions provide the affective component to motivation, positive or negative.

No definitive taxonomy of emotions exists, though numerous taxonomies have been proposed. Some categorizations include:


    - Cognitive" versus "non-cognitive" emotions

    - Instinctual emotions (from the amygdala), versus cognitive emotions (from the prefrontal cortex).

    - Categorization based on duration: Some emotions occur over a period of seconds (for example, surprise), whereas others can last years (for example, love).
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Re: Wheel of Emotions

Postby mirjana » Thu Jun 16, 2011 10:02 pm

This is very interesting. I have always been very interested in polarities. What surprises me a little bit in this wheel are the following opposites:

anger fear
trust disgust

I see fear and anger belonging to the same category and not opposing each other. The same with trust and disgust. More thoughts?
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Re: Wheel of Emotions

Postby Sabina » Sat Jun 18, 2011 12:52 am

Well fear is a passive emotion and anger is not.
Fear can provoke an active response, so it can lead to something else (as Yoda pointed out) but the emotion itself is passive.

There is another classification of emotions, done by EARL (Emotion Annotation and Representation Language), I think it is also interesting:
Image

How do you see trust and disgust belonging to the same category?
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Re: Wheel of Emotions

Postby mirjana » Sat Jun 18, 2011 10:49 pm

Sabina wrote:...
How do you see trust and disgust belonging to the same category?

I made mistake, sorry. What I wanted to say is that I do not see them as two sides of the same coin as they are presented in the classification.
For me the opposite for trust would be distrust, suspicion or doubt.

This new classification is also very interesting.
How about this addition?

Caring
protection

Positive and lively
creativity
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Re: Wheel of Emotions

Postby Sabina » Mon Jun 20, 2011 5:43 pm

Mirjana,
I decided to check on the term "trust", as I don't really see it as an emotion, and... well I still don't see it as an emotion, but what I actually want to share is this.........
It can be demonstrated that humans have a natural disposition to trust and to judge trustworthiness that can be traced to the neurobiological structure and activity of a human brain, and can be altered e.g. by the application of oxytocin.

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"Whether You believe you can, or you can't, you are right."
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Re: Wheel of Emotions

Postby Rachel » Sat Jun 25, 2011 9:14 pm

Related to this dicussion of emotion is the concept of Emotional Intelligence which has been evoving within psychological circles since the late 1980s.

"All learning has an emotional base."
-- Plato
What is Emotional Intelligence?

Emotional intelligence (EI) refers to the ability to perceive, control and evaluate emotions. Some researchers suggest that emotional intelligence can be learned and strengthened, while others claim it is an inborn characteristic.

Since 1990, Peter Salovey and John D. Mayer have been the leading researchers on emotional intelligence. In their influential article "Emotional Intelligence," they defined emotional intelligence as, "the subset of social intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one's thinking and actions" (1990).

The Four Branches of Emotional Intelligence
Salovey and Mayer proposed a model that identified four different factors of emotional intelligence: the perception of emotion, the ability reason using emotions, the ability to understand emotion and the ability to manage emotions.

1.Perceiving Emotions: The first step in understanding emotions is to accurately perceive them. In many cases, this might involve understanding nonverbal signals such as body language and facial expressions.


2.Reasoning With Emotions: The next step involves using emotions to promote thinking and cognitive activity. Emotions help prioritize what we pay attention and react to; we respond emotionally to things that garner our attention.


3.Understanding Emotions: The emotions that we perceive can carry a wide variety of meanings. If someone is expressing angry emotions, the observer must interpret the cause of their anger and what it might mean. For example, if your boss is acting angry, it might mean that he is dissatisfied with your work; or it could be because he got a speeding ticket on his way to work that morning or that he's been fighting with his wife.


4.Managing Emotions: The ability to manage emotions effectively is a key part of emotional intelligence. Regulating emotions, responding appropriately and responding to the emotions of others are all important aspect of emotional management.
According to Salovey and Mayer, the four branches of their model are, "arranged from more basic psychological processes to higher, more psychologically integrated processes. For example, the lowest level branch concerns the (relatively) simple abilities of perceiving and expressing emotion. In contrast, the highest level branch concerns the conscious, reflective regulation of emotion" (1997).


the rest of the article is found here:
http://psychology.about.com/od/personal ... intell.htm

Another leading author and academic who is proficient in the research of Emotional Intelligence is Daniel (Dan) Goldman. His website is here http://danielgoleman.info/biography/

Just some food for thought =0)
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Re: Wheel of Emotions

Postby mirjana » Tue Sep 06, 2011 10:08 pm

It seems that Plato inspired Tony Robbins too. This is an interesting approach to emotions.
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