Treating Logorrhea

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Re: Treating Logorrhea

Postby Rachel » Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:59 am

Ryan, you and Sabina must be privy to some sort of lighthearted joke that I'm not - a post asking for natural remedies for a very real and very serious condition doesn't appear at all to be as you say, 'light hearted'.

Perhaps next time one wants to engage in either a private joke, covert passive aggression or overt humour, inclusion in the 'Witticism' thread and the simple usage of the emoticons to the right hand side of the page would clear up any potential confusion.

I don't know whether you have seen anybody with the affliction mentioned here -have you?

Logorrhea is noted in the DSM 5 as 'brief psychotic episode'. It is dangerous, not contagious, but may escalate into further mental ill health and physical exhaustion for the sufferer.

Over and out. 80S
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Re: Treating Logorrhea

Postby Ryan » Wed Jun 15, 2011 12:25 pm

Yes ma'am...
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Re: Treating Logorrhea

Postby mirjana » Wed Jun 15, 2011 1:39 pm

As I was not familiar with that word I checked it first:
"In psychology, logorrhea or logorrhoea (from Greek λογορροια (logorrhoia); from λόγος (logos), meaning "word", and ῥοία (rhoia), meaning "flow") is a communication disorder, sometimes classified as a mental illness, resulting in incoherent talkativeness. Logorrhea is present in a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders[1] including aphasia, localized cortical lesions in the thalamus,[3][4] mania, or most typically in catatonic schizophrenia.
Examples of logorrhea might include talking or mumbling monotonously, either to others, or more likely to oneself. This may include the repetition of particular words or phrases, often incoherently. The causes of logorrhea remain poorly understood, but appear to be localized to frontal lobe structures known to be associated with language. As is the case, for example, in emotional liability in a wide variety of neurological conditions, other symptoms take priority in clinical management and research efforts. Other symptoms include excessive talking, words that avoid any logic or reason, words that may offend other people and random words which hearers may ascribe unintended meaning to.
Logorrhea should not be confused with pressure of speech, which is characterized by the "flighty" alternation from topic to topic by tenuous links such as rhyming or punning.[5] Logorrhea is a symptom of an underlying illness, and should be treated by a medical professional. Several possible causes of logorrhea respond well to medication."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logorrhea_(psychology)


In 1972 Samuel Beckett wrote a dramatic monologue Not I. It i9s written as a logorrhea.





__7__


It is a kind of art to keep a balance between clarity and staying concise omitting needless words when communicating.
I like what Mark Twain said:" The fewer the words that fully communicate or evoke the intended ideas and feelings, the more effective the communication."
Easy to say and not always easy to do like this.

Mark Twain (1835–1910) wrote "generally, the fewer the words that fully communicate or evoke the intended ideas and feelings, the more effective the communication."
Ernest Hemingway , who was a Nobel prizewinner for literature in 1954, was charged by William Faulkner for having too concise style so that his reader hardly ever needed a dictionary. Hemingway responded:" Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words? He thinks I don't know the ten-dollar words. I know them all right. But there are older and simpler and better words, and those are the ones I use."
Having all this in mind, I can imagine that a nice help for this illness could be practicing expressing thoughts in always shorter way, so that at the end one comes with the shortest version of that s/he wanted to say.
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Re: Treating Logorrhea

Postby Jade » Wed Jun 15, 2011 1:59 pm

Chessa wrote:Perhaps next time one wants to engage in either a private joke, covert passive aggression or overt humour, inclusion in the 'Witticism' thread and the simple usage of the emoticons to the right hand side of the page would clear up any potential confusion.


What is Dry Humor?
Often referred to as deadpan humor, dry humor is a comedy technique that is characterized by a calm and straightforward delivery by the performer. This is in contrast to such comedy art forms as slapstick or sketch comedy, which often relies upon broad gestures, exaggerated facial expressions, or an emphasized tone or tenor in order to heighten the comic appeal of the joke or remark. Often, dry humor is associated with what some people refer to as highbrow comedy, as the style requires a degree of restraint in order to be effective. However, good dry humor usually employs words that are easily accessible to persons of just about educational level and often makes use of everyday terms as part of the content.

With dry humor, the focus is on the actual words that are used, rather than the use of various devices that call attention or emphasis to parts of the delivery process. The construction of the joke or script may in and of itself be slightly mocking or sarcastic in nature, although the vocal delivery will tend to limit the use of inflection or tone to convey those qualities. Instead, the delivery of the humor tends to be in normal casual tones, sometimes accompanied with a slight smile or look that is allowed just a hint of irony. This helps pull the attention of the audience to the words themselves, rather than distracting them with movements or expressions.

The double-entendre is a very common verbal device used in the delivery of dry humor. An excellent example of this device is found in British comedy. Considered by many persons to be masters in the art of dry humor, many British comedy presentations over the years have employed the use of a common term that in fact could have more than one meaning, often one that was considered to be slightly racy. When delivered in a perfectly serious and deadpan mode, this dry humor device can produce riotous responses from an audience, and seems to stay fresh over an extended period of time.

Many successful comedic performers, both British and American, have built careers based on the successful employment of dry humor. Along with stage, television, and movie performers, many writers make use of dry humor in novels, magazine articles, and newspaper columns.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-dry-humor.htm
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Re: Treating Logorrhea

Postby Rachel » Thu Jun 16, 2011 7:56 am

Thanks for the replies.

Jade, in the absence of vocal inflections and facial cues, dry humour is evidenced in the written form by what means?

And, please, if someone could enlighten me on the exact nature of the humour in the OP (original post), I'd be ever so grateful.
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Re: Treating Logorrhea

Postby Jade » Thu Jun 16, 2011 5:51 pm

Chessa wrote:Jade, in the absence of vocal inflections and facial cues, dry humour is evidenced in the written form by what means?

How about the smiley in the OP?
I would call that a hint.
It is not easily visible but it is there.

Chessa wrote:And, please, if someone could enlighten me on the exact nature of the humour in the OP (original post), I'd be ever so grateful.

It seemed like you did understand it as humor at first. Perhaps not at the very beginning but soon thereafter, e.g.
Chessa wrote:I hope the afflicted feels better soon. =0@


Why the LOL (laugh out loud) smiley unless you understood it as humorous and replied adequately?
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Re: Treating Logorrhea

Postby Sabina » Thu Jun 16, 2011 8:06 pm

Chessa wrote:Thanks for the replies.

Jade, in the absence of vocal inflections and facial cues, dry humour is evidenced in the written form by what means?

And, please, if someone could enlighten me on the exact nature of the humour in the OP (original post), I'd be ever so grateful.


As Jade pointed out, there was that smiley to indicate that it was not a serious brooding question, but that doesn't necessarily answer your second question, in regards to the nature of the humor.

First of all, Logorrhea is a synonym for verbosity.
It is not only a psychological disorder, but also a word for something quite benign, sometimes annoying and something most humans have had a personal experience with.
Why say "logorrhea" in lieu of "verbosity" is easy... because logorrhea sounds similar to a very common condition in humans, and again one absolutely everyone has experienced at some point of their life, namely diarrhea.
So, it sounds like something in need of a treatment......
And since we have a natural healing forum, and since life isn't all serious all of the time, and a humorous or light-hearted comment or question can help break the routine on any given day and breathe life into a conversation, it was posted, and posted without any additional explanation or definition of the term.
The idea was that whoever isn't familiar with the term would look it up, see which two meanings it has, and then given the simplicity of the question, as well as that infamous smiley at the far bottom of the post, realize that it was a humorous question, and reply in such a manner.....

Posting it in the witticism forum would have been just way too obvious and therefore defeated the entire purpose.
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Re: Treating Logorrhea

Postby Rachel » Sat Jun 25, 2011 8:35 pm

Thank you again for the replies, people. I appreciate the effort =0)

I still am left wondering about the exact nature of the intended humour, Sabina. Perhaps the attempted wit is so highly nuanced that it has bypassed the correct cognition channels in my apparent inferior brain. 80S

As for the usage of smilie emoticons in the original post, to be honest I thought the little happy face was part of your forum signature as it was so far removed from the text. Thanks for clearing that up for me.
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