The Fountain of Youth

Experiences, questions and discussions on various aspects of mysticism, psychic abilities and psionics.

The Fountain of Youth

Postby Sabina » Tue May 18, 2010 7:53 pm

The Fountain of Youth is a legendary spring that reputedly restores the youth of anyone who drinks of its waters. Tales of such a fountain have been recounted across the world for thousands of years, appearing in writings by Herodotus, the Alexander romance, and the stories of Prester John. Stories of a similar waters were also evidently prominent among the indigenous peoples of the Caribbean during the Age of Exploration, who spoke of the restorative powers of the water in the mythical land of Bimini.
Source: Wikipedia

[@]

Today, the Fountain of Youth is a metaphor for anything that prolongs life. There are numerous examples of the metaphorical Fountain of Youth, but I thought that the following three were interesting for associative discussion.

1. The US-American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne used the Fountain in "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment" to demonstrate that positive thinking is a far better remedy than deluded journeys to Florida for legendary cures.

2. In 1974, Marvel Comics featured the Fountain which works if bathed in, but cripples if drunk from.

3. The Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges refers to the Fountain of Life in a short story in the book The Aleph, in which the people who are immortal get tired of it and eventually start looking for the Fountain of Death to reverse their immortality.
"Whether You believe you can, or you can't, you are right."
User avatar
Sabina
 
Posts: 1752
Joined: Sun Dec 20, 2009 7:11 am
Location: Vienna, Austria
Personality: Ambivert
Favorite book: Confession by Tolstoy + Chess novel by Zweig
Favorite movie: Matrix + Baraka
Things I like: the arts, free thinkers, creativity, passion, intelligence, honesty
State of Mind or Tendency: Artistic
Kudos: 61

The Five Tibetan Rejuvenation Rites

Postby mirjana » Tue May 18, 2010 9:18 pm

In the book 'Ancient Secret of the Fountain of Youth' by Peter Kelder , published 1985, there are five Rites of Rejuvenation. They are originally known from the 'The Eye of Revelation', (1939). The original contains not only, the original manuscript contents and drawings, but also the Sixth Rite.
Each of the five movements should be performed from to 21 times, starting with three of each during the first week and then slowly increasing by three exercises per week each movement. It is recommended to close your eyes and stand with your feet hip distance apart, hands on hips, after each movement. Form an "O" with your lips as you slowly inhale and exhale for two breaths.
The story tells that Tibetan Buddhist monks in their isolated monastery in the Himalayas have practiced these five exercises for thousands of years to help them live long and healthy lives.
These five exercises are easy to do and produce an alert feeling in both body and mind. Start gently, doing only what is easy and comfortable for you, and to build up the number of repetitions of each exercise gradually. The process should normally take 2- 3 weeks in order to accustom the body to these movements. When you come to the final number of exercises which is 21 for each of five movements, it will take you from 10 to 20 minutes. It is really not much time for great results.
I advise you to do them in the morning, although it can be another time too. Each time when you can take this time for you in silence, is a good time. If you do it in the morning it will leave you to feel better for the rest of the day. If you do them in the evening, it will improve the quality of your sleep.
The most important thing is to exercise them each day. The maximum you should skip is one day each week. If the exercises are done less than six days each week, the results will be greatly reduced.
It is important to start out slowly by performing one to three repetitions of each of the movements one time each day for one week. Respect your body and do not strain or force any position that causes pain that indicates possible injury. Each next week add three more exercises of each movement and do so until you reach 21 exercises for each movement. It will take you 7 weeks to make the whole program without difficulties. And from then on it will be easy for you to do these Rites each day.
An important part of this Tibetan exercises is a conscious breathing. Before beginning the exercises, practice the basic 4 - stage breathing techniques, which will make your breathing consciously synchronized.
• Inhale(slowly counting mentally to 8)
• Hold filled lungs(counting mentally to 4)
• Exhale.(counting mentally to 8)
• Hold empty lungs(counting mentally to 4)
Please consult your physician prior to beginning these exercises if you have any difficult health issues or if you have any other concerns, such as heart problems, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s Disease, severe arthritis of the spine, high blood pressure, hyperthyroid condition or vertigo.
Rite First: Twirling


1. Stand up, stretch out your arms at shoulder height and start to spin by turning clockwise (to the right).
To avoid dizziness, do what dancers and figure skaters do. Before you begin to spin, focus your vision on a single point straight ahead.
As you begin to turn, continue to hold your vision on that point for as long as possible. Eventually, you will have to let it leave your field of vision, so that your head can spin around with the rest of your body.
When this happens, turn your head quickly and refocus on your point as soon as you can. Holding your vision on the fixed reference point helps to stop you becoming disoriented and dizzy.
2. At the end of this exercises, stand with your hands in front of you watching your palms, which will bring you to the balance easier.

Repeat the sequence 3 times building up gradually by 3 repetitions each week, until you reach to a total of 21 repetitions.

Rite Second: Head and Leg Raises


Lie flat on your back on a firm surface with your hands by your sides and palms down.
Breathing in, raise your legs straight up into the air.
At the same time, lift your head up as if you were going to touch your head to your knees. Keep your legs straight.
If possible, let your legs extend back over your body, towards your head, but do not let your knees bend.
Then, slowly lower both your head and legs (keeping the knees straight) to the floor and breathe out.
Allow all your muscles to relax and rest before repeating the movement.
Repeat the sequence 3 times building up gradually by 3 repetitions each week, until you reach to a total of 21 repetitions.


Rite Third: Back Arches


On a carpeted floor, kneel with your body erect and your knees directly under your hips.
Bend your head and neck forward, tucking the chin against the chest and place your hands at the back of your thighs below the buttocks. Curl your toes under, and arch your back as you inhale, letting your head drop as far back as is comfortable. Keep your thighs in a vertical position and avoid strain. Return to the original position and breathe out. Rest before repeating the procedure.
Breathe in deeply as you arch the spine; breathe out as you return to an erect position. Repeat this 3 times building up gradually each week by three repetitions until you reach to a total of 21 repetitions.

Rite Four: The Bridge

Sit with your legs straight out in front of you with your feet flexed, and your palms flat on the floor by your sides next to your hips, with fingertips pointing toward toes.
Bend your head forward and, as you breathe in, raise your knees and buttocks up in the air making your thighs parallel with the floor and your calves perpendicular to the floor.
Then allow your head to stretch backwards just far enough to make your body, from the shoulders to the knees, parallel to the floor like a table top. Try not to over-arch your back.
Next, tense every muscle in your body. Finally, relax your muscles as you return to the original sitting position and breathe out.
Rest before repeating the procedure.
Breathe in as you rise up, hold your breath as you tense the muscles, and breathe out completely as you come down. Continue breathing in the same rhythm as long as you rest between repetitions. Repeat this 3 times building up gradually each week for 3 repetitions until you reach to a total of 21 repetitions.

Rite Five: Modified Cat

Lie flat on the floor with the palms face down under directly under your shoulders and toes in contact with the floor as if you were about to do push-ups. Raise your head and extend it backwards, arching your upper back as far as is comfortable while keeping the legs straight. This is known as the cat position. Curl your toes under as you push up off the floor with straight arms and your hands directly under your shoulders. Keep your head aligned with your spine and make sure your arms and legs remain straight. Make sure you keep your shoulders down (don't let them scrunch up to your ears) and keep your hips lifted off the floor. Inhale and lift your hips while pushing down through the heels inverting your position until your head faces your knees.
Again do not bend the knees but keep your legs straight.
Exhaling, release this position and return to the original 'Cat' position.
Then lower the body to the starting position on the floor and rest before repeating the procedure.
Breathe in deeply as you raise the body; breathe out fully as you lower it. Repeat this 3 times building up gradually each week by 3 repetitions until you reach to a total of 21 repetitions.

=0)
User avatar
mirjana
 
Posts: 1614
Joined: Mon Dec 21, 2009 4:09 pm
State of Mind or Tendency: Inspired
Kudos: 48

Re: The Fountain of Youth

Postby Daywhite » Tue May 18, 2010 9:34 pm

Reminds me of an episode of the classic Twilight Zone television series. In the episode, a man is granted eternal life, never to die, no matter what. Initially, unsure he really can't be killed, he experiments with things, hurting himself, before finally taking the plunge and jumping from the top of a tall building. Sure enough, as promised, he is fine. He even has a train run over him, knowing he'll survive basically unscathed. He is quite happy with his new power. No one else, including his wife, know anything about his new power.

But, being the classic show that it is, when one enters The Twilight Zone, there is sure to be a twist.

One night, if I remember right, he is bored and goes up to the top of his building, thinking of jumping, just for the rush of it. Unknown to him, his wife followed him up, curious about his strange behaviour of late. As she opens the door onto the roof, she sees her husband standing on the ledge of the building, high above the street. She rushes to him, screaming for him to not do it. She tries to grab him; he tries to grab her, and they both tumble over. Again, I could be a bit sketchy on the details; it's been years since I last saw this.

The denouement comes in that he is tried for his wife's murder and sentenced to life in prison.

The common theme in all stories of a fountain of youth, whatever the source, seems to be simply be happy with who you are and what you have. No matter what one may or may not have, there will always be something that appears to be better, if for no other reason than the mystery, the draw of the unknown. Just as with angels being jealous of humans because of the many things in the physical world we can experience that they cannot, or so it has been said, humans are jealous of angels because of some mythical power they have.

Everyone wants what they don't or can't have. I see it simply as human nature. I see no real problem in desiring more, wanting things just out of reach. But, I feel one must be careful to always be mindful of what he does have. Long for a fountain of youth, if you want; hell, even search for it, if you desire. But don't let your quest or your desires rob you of your present. As someone said (maybe the Bible; I don't know), "Of course man's reach should exceed his grasp, else what is heaven for?"
"Sometimes you do it to save your own life, not anybody else's. That's mostly why I write. I'm not trying to change anybody else's life or the world; I'm trying to keep from blowing my own brains out. That's the real point." -- Guy Clark
User avatar
Daywhite
 
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 4:08 pm
Location: Alabama
Personality: Introvert
State of Mind or Tendency: Neutral
Kudos: 18

Re: The Fountain of Youth

Postby mirjana » Wed May 19, 2010 8:12 am

Daywhite wrote:...
The common theme in all stories of a fountain of youth, whatever the source, seems to be simply be happy with who you are and what you have. No matter what one may or may not have, there will always be something that appears to be better, if for no other reason than the mystery, the draw of the unknown. Just as with angels being jealous of humans because of the many things in the physical world we can experience that they cannot, or so it has been said, humans are jealous of angels because of some mythical power they have.

Everyone wants what they don't or can't have. I see it simply as human nature. I see no real problem in desiring more, wanting things just out of reach. But, I feel one must be careful to always be mindful of what he does have. Long for a fountain of youth, if you want; hell, even search for it, if you desire. But don't let your quest or your desires rob you of your present. As someone said (maybe the Bible; I don't know), "Of course man's reach should exceed his grasp, else what is heaven for?"

Kudos for this beautiful comparison between angels and human that explains a lot about this topic.
User avatar
mirjana
 
Posts: 1614
Joined: Mon Dec 21, 2009 4:09 pm
State of Mind or Tendency: Inspired
Kudos: 48

Re: The Fountain of Youth

Postby Sabina » Wed May 19, 2010 7:00 pm

2. In 1974, Marvel Comics featured the Fountain which works if bathed in, but cripples if drunk from.

I thought that the above example is interesting because it implies the necessity of knowledge.
If you know how to use it properly it benefits you.
If you don't have this knowledge, so if you are ignorant of it, then not only does it not benefit you, but it can harm you as well.

Think about it. :)
"Whether You believe you can, or you can't, you are right."
User avatar
Sabina
 
Posts: 1752
Joined: Sun Dec 20, 2009 7:11 am
Location: Vienna, Austria
Personality: Ambivert
Favorite book: Confession by Tolstoy + Chess novel by Zweig
Favorite movie: Matrix + Baraka
Things I like: the arts, free thinkers, creativity, passion, intelligence, honesty
State of Mind or Tendency: Artistic
Kudos: 61


Return to Mysticism

Who is online

Registered users: No registered users

cron
StumbleUpon Digg Delicious Reddit Yahoo Google Live Facebook Twitter MySpace