Salty Foods

A collection of interesting tales or information regarding nature itself and/or people in nature.
by Ryan

Salty Foods

Postby Ryan » Sun Apr 25, 2010 10:54 pm

In this topic I would like to touch on living in areas where the majority of resources will be coming from saltwater.

Let's start with the shores of bodies saltwater as there is an abundance of food to be found right there on the rocks and in the sand. Crabs and a wide variety of shellfish. Only eat mollusks that were collect alive. Bivalves, such as oysters, mussels, etc., should close tightly if tapped on. Bivalves can build up dangerous concentrations of toxic chemicals in polluted areas, so pay attention to surrounding waters. Also, mussels are poisonous in tropical regions in the summer and in the Arctic black mussels are poisonous all year round. Gastropods, such as winkles, whelks, etc., have a trapdoor entrance which should close tightly if the shell is shaken. Limpets and abalones attach themselves to rocks and would need to be pried off with a knife, or other firm edged object, if they come of easily then they are either sick or dead and should be discarded. Due to the possibility of parasites and pollutants you should cook all shell fish by boiling for at least 5 minutes.

On most coastlines the ideal time to fish from shore is approximately two hours after high tide. Also use the tide to your advantage by placing traps.

Sea Cucumbers can be eaten. They live on the bottom and look like black warty cucumbers. You can also eat sea urchins but they should be avoided if their splines do not move when touched or if they smell bad. Just boil them and split them open to eat the egg-like insides.

You can also catch sea birds by leaving baited hooks amongst offal on flat rocks or you can even throw baited hooks into the air to be taken in mid-flight by them. You can also search for their eggs as they nest on the ground...or on cliffs.

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Another source of food provided by the sea would be seaweeds. Seaweeds can be found growing on the bottom or floating in open water. Their color generally depends on the depth at which they are grown... green in shallow water, red in deeper water, and brown in deep water.
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1. Sea Lettuce - Grows on rocks and stones in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, especially where water runs into the sea. It has light green leaves and should be washed and boiled.
2. Enteromorpha Intestinalis - Can be found in rock pools and salt marshes in cool waters. They are pale green with pod-like non-branching fronds approximately 50 cm (2 ft) long.The whole plant is edible in early spring either fresh or dried and powdered.
3. Kelps - Found on the rocky shores of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. They have a short cylindrical stem and thin, long, wavy olive green to brown fronds that are edible raw but best boiled.
4. Lavers - Also found in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans with thin, satiny red, purple, or brown fronds. It is best used as a relish or mixed with grains to make cakes by boiling until it is tender and them crushing into a batter like substance.
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As for fish... saltwater fish are vast and very massively varied depending on region and rather than getting into what all fish are safe to eat I am going to tell you which ones to steer away from... and which ones to be extremely careful with.
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1. Stingrays are generally found in shallow waters all over the world. They are all vastly different but all retain that "ray" shape. They have venomous spines in the tail and can inflict serious damage resulting in amputation or even death.
2. Rabbitfish or Spinefoots are found mainly on reefs in the Indian and Pacific oceans. They are about 25 - 30 cm (10 - 12 in) in length. They are edible but the sharp spines in most of their fins are very venomous and therefore should be handled with extreme caution and care.
3. Tang or Surgeonfish are found in tropical waters practically worlwide and are often in large schools. They are approximately 20 - 25 cm (8 - 10 in) in length, deep bodied, small-mouthed, and colorful. The dorsal fin spines contain venom glands but most damage seems to be distributed from razor sharp blades near the tail and in some species the blades are extended like a switch blade knife.
4. Toadfish are found in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate waters and generally lie buried in sand. Thea are about 7 - 10 cm (4 - 8 in) in length, dull colored, and large mouthed. They have extremely sharp and poisonous spines on both sides of their head.
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5. Scorpionfish or Zebrafish are found on reefs in the Indian and Pacific oceans. They are about 10 - 20 cm (4 - 8 in) long with wide variances but usually reddish brown with long, wavy fin rays and spines. Their sting is extremely painful and may cause heart failure.
6. Stonefish are found in Indo-Pacific waters and their drab colors and lumpy shape makes them difficult to spot.They are around 40 cm (16 in) long and if stepped on the dorsal spines inject a venom that is extremely painful that cause convulsions and paralysis. Recovery from such occurrences have taken several months and can be deadly.
7. Weaverfish are found along the coasts of Europe, south to west Africa, and the Mediterranean and lie buried in shallow sandy bays. The venom from the spines on their backs and gills cause disabling pain and can be fatal. To sooth apply very hot water and be attentive as there is an extreme risk of secondary infections and gangrene.

The following fish are poisonous to eat and should be avoided by any and all means.
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1. Triggerfish can be found in an immense variety but are all deep bodied, compressed, usually under 60 cm (2 ft) long with very large and stout dorsal spines. They are mostly in shallow tropical seas.
2. Puffer fish are found in tropical and warmer temperate waters and some rivers in Southeast Asia and tropical Africa. They are stout bodied, rounded, 15 - 75 cm (6 - 30 in) long most having spines and when alarmed they puff up into a ball. Their blood, liver, and testicles are poisonous to the extent that even a tiny quantity of the poison can cause death.
3. Porcupine fish found in shallow tropical waters all over the world and inflate into a spiny ball when startled. While they vary in appearance they are generally dull in coloring and between 50 - 60 cm (20 - 24 in) in length.
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And last... but certainly not least... some other dangerous creatures to keep in mind... for you and your children!
1. Portuguese Man-of-War is mainly a sub-tropical fish and is commonly found in the Gulf Stream. They tend to waters that are high in salinity such as Australia and Florida. While the floating bladder may only be around 15 cm (6 in) their tentacles can reach lengths of up to 15 meters (40 ft). Their stings are very painful and may cause breathing and swimming difficulties.
2. Blue-ringed Octopusis small, sometimes only the size of a fist, and found in shallow waters and pools near Australia. Venom causes swelling, dizziness, and respiratory paralysis. All reef octopi should be treated with caution.
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3. Cone shell gastropods are tropical and sub-tropical shellfish with a venomous harpoon-like barb which pokes through the narrow end of the shell. The venom can cause temporary paralysis and breathing difficulties leading to death within 6 hours.
4. Auger or Terebra are found in temperate and tropical seas and has a stinging barb much thinner and longer than that of the cone shell but not as serious.
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In addition, and as a recap/elaboration of some things previously presented, there are many inshore fish that live in lagoons or reefs that are poisonous to eat. Most of these are confined to the tropics, however, wherever you are be cautious of eating any fish you cannot positively identify. Even some fish, when taken from reefs, that are normally safe to eat can be inedible due to an absorption of poisonous substances.

As a general precaution shoes should always be worn when wading in saltwater shallows as to avoid being pricked, stabbed, or cut by fish, stone, or shells. Infections can get bad rather quickly and result in the loss of a limb or even death in the worst case.
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Re: Salty Foods

Postby mirjana » Mon Apr 26, 2010 12:33 am

Ryan,
What an information!!! And we would say that shark are dangerous =0o
Who would say that so beutiful fish could be so dangereous. Good to know.
I didn't know that Sea Cucumbers can be eaten. They look quite disguasting to me =0X
This information about seaweeds is interesting for me. I think that these are very helthy too.
Thank you Ryan for another great and informative article.
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Re: Salty Foods

Postby Ryan » Mon Apr 26, 2010 1:34 am

Glad you liked it, and thank you for the intro!
80S
(some will think we set this up!)

Speaking of sharks! I would like to take this opportunity to recommend a movie to all the Deep Spirits out there. "Sharkwater" if you haven't watched it, do, it is amazing.

Also, as a result of this movie we were introduced to Paul Watson, of the Sea Shepherd Organization, a true hero of the oceans and all types of wild life that live within. I respect these guys and all that they do and I wish and hope that they receive much more support for their efforts in the future.
[R] If you don't understand something I said or why I said it... ask me.
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Re: Salty Foods

Postby Ryan » Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:28 am



[R] If you don't understand something I said or why I said it... ask me.
If you don't want to understand something I said or why I said it... tell me.
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Ryan
 
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Re: Salty Foods

Postby mirjana » Mon Apr 26, 2010 11:06 am

Ryan wrote:Glad you liked it, and thank you for the intro!
80S
(some will think we set this up!)


=0@ I do not care! I love information about nature. Since I remembered everything that was of this kind like this section here has belonged to my interest. My favourite children literature was of that kind too. I cannot repeat enough that Robinson Cruso and Heidi still belong between my favourute books, in spite of that that I have studied world literature and have read enormeous numbers of all possible books. Obviously it is a very strong part of my nature and therefore I became the fan of this section. 80S
Ryan wrote:Speaking of sharks! I would like to take this opportunity to recommend a movie to all the Deep Spirits out there. "Sharkwater" if you haven't watched it, do, it is amazing.

Also, as a result of this movie we were introduced to Paul Watson, of the Sea Shepherd Organization, a true hero of the oceans and all types of wild life that live within. I respect these guys and all that they do and I wish and hope that they receive much more support for their efforts in the future.


Great that you mentioned both, this movie and Sea Shepherd. <3
The movie is one of great examples how easy we let us brain wash and become followers of everything that nurtures our fears.
And Sea Shepherd organization and Paul Watson who stands with his crew over twenty-five years on the front lines with the harp seals has become my symbol for that what does it mean to do something significantly good for the better world. If I was younger I would become a part of his crew.
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Re: Salty Foods

Postby brownsugarleanne » Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:48 pm

Ha. Growing up in Australia, I knew of a large majority of those creatures and especially the poisonous ones. Informative post.
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