Paintings and Consciousness

Paintings, photography, graphics and other visual arts.

Paintings and Consciousness

Postby Sabina » Sun Jan 24, 2010 3:54 am

Before the first photographs were made painters probably had an even bigger importance than today, at least practically speaking, as they were also there to record history. Capturing people (portraits), or illustrating ideas was an additional bonus.

We all know the saying "A picture is worth a thousand words", but in terms of affecting humanity, its progress and inspiring the advancement of consciousness, what role would say painters and paintings had and have?

Sabina
"Whether You believe you can, or you can't, you are right."
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Re: Paintings and Consciousness

Postby mirjana » Sun Jan 24, 2010 1:19 pm

Dear Sabina,

I gave you Kudos for opening this topic and by two brilliant observations, the first one going into the past and the other pointing the future.
"..., as they were record history. Capturing people (portraits) or illustrating ideas was an additional bonus."
So simple and self understanding as a statement, but still not commonly understood that way. For bringing back this important recognition and for challenging us (me) to dig into my consciousness in order to recognize paintings that were/are for me those with such an impact, I am grateful and challenged to start this journey myself.

Mirjana
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Re: Paintings and Consciousness

Postby Sabina » Sat Jan 30, 2010 7:22 am

"Art is a human activity having for its purpose the transmission to others of the highest and best feelings to which men have risen."
... says Leo Tolstoy.

If we agree that the above is true, then that would mean that paintings and painters had quite a large impact on society and hence consciousness as well.

Tolstoy also says...
"The activity of art is... as important as the activity of language itself, and as universal."

Again, if that is true, then a painter deserves no less credit than a philosopher or a writer.
Not every painter of course, same as not every philosopher or writer... but those painters that stood out and inspired and provoked with their art therefore deserve to be included, in my opinion.
"Whether You believe you can, or you can't, you are right."
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Universal language of paintings

Postby mirjana » Sat Jan 30, 2010 2:20 pm

Sabina wrote:The activity of art is... as important as the activity of language itself, and as universal."

Again, if that is true, then a painter deserves no less credit than a philosopher or a writer.
Not every painter of course, same as not every philosopher or writer... but those painters that stood out and inspired and provoked with their art therefore deserve to be included, in my opinion.

I agree with this opinion completely.
Paintings transmit thoughts, emotions and energy transforming the same time all these elements in the mind and heart of one who is observer. They make something invisible to be visible and recognized and in that sense they are out of time, as the whole transmission and reception happens in the moment. It is the fastest way to bring an idea as a whole to the mind of another, based of understanding of something which could be called universal language.
Using images and symbols which belong to universal language, paintings make possible things which are not easy to be grasped, to be understood with the essence of the being much easier and without prejudices, as in this essence everybody knows that we are all part of one.
Paintings belong to universal way of expression which is not connected with any of usual human limitations (language, traditions, religion). As such, they are like universal guidance that connects us with eternal values, common for all, making possible to understand them on this universal level, as something which will be observed the same all over around without putting it in any frame priory.
Isn´´t it for self a beautiful bridge for uniting different level of understanding and consciousness?

Mirjana
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Picasso's Guernica as anti war symbol

Postby mirjana » Tue Feb 02, 2010 10:38 pm

Pablo Picasso created his antiwar mural called Guernica for the Spanish Pavilion of the 1937 Worlds Fair.

"On April 27th, 1937, on behalf of Franco terrible atrocities are done against the civilian population of a little Basque village in northern Spain. Chosen for bombing practice by Hitler's burgeoning war machine, the hamlet is pounded with high-explosive and incendiary bombs for over three hours. Townspeople are cut down as they run from the crumbling buildings. Guernica burns for three days. Sixteen hundred civilians are killed or wounded."


When news of the massacre at Guernica reaches Paris, May 1st, more than a million protesters flood the streets to voice their outrage in the largest May Day demonstration the city has ever seen. Picasso was appalled and enraged and as his protest against war he quickly sketches the first images for the mural he will call Guernica.

His words about this masterpiece are:
"A painting is not thought out and settled in advance. While it is being done, it changes as one's thoughts change. And when it's finished, it goes on changing, according to the state of mind of whoever is looking at it."

Since then, it has become a symbol painting against the war that keeps visitors in front of the painting long in deep and compassionate feelings against war.



One of Guernica Interpretation




A 3D Exploration of Picasso's Guernica
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Francisco de Goya 'The Third of May 1808'

Postby mirjana » Thu Mar 04, 2010 2:00 am

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, was Spanish painter and printmaker who profoundly influenced the foundation of Modern art by representing contemporary social and political upheavals in works such as Los Caprichos and The Disasters of War.
He became completely deaf in 1746 as a result of a prolonged fever, turning his interest to reading, particularly about French revolution. He studied human condition and strongly opposed social abuses and corruption. During a period of national and personal difficulty, Goya created Los Capriccios, a series of eighty etchings about goblins and monks, aristocrats and prostitutes and other characters enacting themes such as the excesses of the nobility, the Spanish Inquisition, and the corruption of the church.

Image

The Third of May 1808

His famous antiwar painting is The Third of May 1808
Among several shootings, Goya chose the ones at the Príncipe Pío hill. The painting measures 3.45 by 2.66 meters, was completed in 1814 and is on display in Museo del Prado, in Madrid.
The picture was painted by order of the Spanish king together with The Second of May 1808 (also known as The Charge of the Mamelukes) to celebrate the stand of the people of Madrid against the forces of Alju. They may have been made from sketches drawn by witnesses at the shootings.
Its influence on later war painters is extensive, most famously Picasso's Guernica.
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