Obedience Experiment

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Obedience Experiment

Postby Sabina » Tue Mar 16, 2010 4:04 pm

Stanley Milgram is the man who - in short - showed the world that most people are sheep. The question he posed was exactly how far do people go in obeying an authority...

In 1961/62 a series of social psychology experiments were conducted at Yale University. Volunteers were paid a small sum to participate in what they understood would be 'a study of memory and learning'. What they were actually participating in was an experiment on obedience to authority figures. The actual question was if any person would give a lethal electric shock to a complete stranger just because someone in a white coat (authority figure) tells him to. The results were shocking.

The original setup of Milgram's study on obedience was as follows:

Milgram-Experiment.jpg
Milgram-Experiment.jpg (15.83 KiB) Viewed 10224 times

E - Experimenter | T - Teacher | L - Learner

The experimenter and the learner are in on the actual experiment, which is obedience to authority, the "teacher" thinks he/she is participating in a study on learning.

Milgram first wrote about his research in an "Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology" article in 1963, and one year later in his book "Obedience to Authority: An Experimental View".

The experiment was replicated (on small scale) in 2009... here is the video in 3 parts.






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Re: Obedience Experiment

Postby Sabina » Tue Mar 23, 2010 9:20 pm

There are other ways of making sure the masses follow obediently, maybe even happily. Take it from someone with "experience" in that field.
Image

Not thinking for ourselves, or blindly believing the media, or blindly following an authority.. all of that is blind obedience, not unlike Milgram's sheep. It is a luxury nobody can really afford, because the consequences of this obedience will eventually begin to show.

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Re: Obedience Experiment

Postby Heidi » Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:02 am

And the disappointing fact is that when the "experiment" was done again by Derren Brown, some time ago, the percentage of people who took it to the end was the same as back in the 60s.

And now we are considered to be more educated, more open-minded, more informed and more suspicious after so many "conspiracy theories" that are all around...

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Re: Obedience Experiment

Postby Pat » Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:21 pm

I had to study the experiment that took place in the fifties when I was in college. The results of that experiment were the same 60 % of thee population would follow orders especially if they were told they were not to be held responsible. That percentage seems to be the same as that of people who can be lead around by politicians in to voting for insane laws and fighting useless wars. The same percentage that will join a mob and a group of vigilantes. I see little change in the world until more people can think for them selves.
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Re: Obedience Experiment

Postby mirjana » Wed May 19, 2010 8:42 am

There are different methods to make people be obedient. Today's corportaions have their methods. The following is the material I have thank to the friend who post about it on Facebook.

Chevron's "Crude" Attempt to Suppress Free Speech
Saturday 15 May 2010
by: Bill Moyers and Michael Winship, t r u t h o u t | Op-Ed

Even as headlines and broadcast news are dominated by BP's fire-ravaged, sunken offshore rig and the ruptured well gushing a reported 210,000 gallons of oil per day into the Gulf of Mexico, there's another important story involving Big Oil and pollution - one that shatters not only the environment but the essential First Amendment right of journalists to tell truth and shame the devil.

(Have you read, by the way, that after the surviving, dazed and frightened workers were evacuated from that burning platform, they were met by lawyers from the drilling giant Transocean with forms to sign stating they had not been injured and had no first-hand knowledge of what had happened?! So much for the corporate soul.)

But our story is about another petrochemical giant - Chevron - and a major threat to independent journalism. In New York last Thursday, Federal Judge Lewis A. Kaplan ordered documentary producer and director Joe Berlinger to turn over to Chevron more than 600 hours of raw footage used to create a film titled Crude: The Real Price of Oil.

Released last year, it's the story of how 30,000 Ecuadorians rose up to challenge the pollution of their bodies, livestock, rivers and wells from Texaco's drilling for oil there, a rainforest disaster that has been described as the Amazon's Chernobyl. When Chevron acquired Texaco in 2001 and attempted to dismiss claims that it was now responsible, the indigenous people and their lawyers fought back in court.

Some of the issues and nuances of Berlinger's case are admittedly complex, but they all boil down to this: Chevron is trying to avoid responsibility and hopes to find in the unused footage - material the filmmaker did not utilize in the final version of his documentary - evidence helpful to the company in fending off potential damages of $27.3 billion.

This is a serious matter for reporters, filmmakers and frankly, everyone else. Tough, investigative reporting without fear or favor - already under siege by severe cutbacks and the shutdown of newspapers and other media outlets - is vital to the public awareness and understanding essential to a democracy. As Michael Moore put it, "The chilling effect of this is, [to] someone like me, if something like this is upheld, the next whistleblower at the next corporation is going to think twice about showing me some documents if that information has to be turned over to the corporation that they're working for."

In an open letter on Joe Berlinger's behalf, signed by many in the non-fiction film business (including the two of us), the Independent Documentary Association described Chevron's case as a "fishing expedition" and wrote that, "At the heart of journalism lies the trust between the interviewer and his or her subject. Individuals who agree to be interviewed by the news media are often putting themselves at great risk, especially in the case of television news and documentary film where the subject's identity and voice are presented in the final report.

"If witnesses sense that their entire interviews will be scrutinized by attorneys and examined in courtrooms they will undoubtedly speak less freely. This ruling surely will have a crippling effect on the work of investigative journalists everywhere, should it stand."

Just so. With certain exceptions, the courts have considered outtakes of a film to be the equivalent of a reporter's notebook, to be shielded from the scrutiny of others. If we - reporters, journalists, filmmakers - are required to turn research, transcripts and outtakes over to a government or a corporation - or to one party in a lawsuit - the whole integrity of the process of journalism is in jeopardy; no one will talk to us.

In his decision, Judge Kaplan wrote that, "Review of Berlinger's outtakes will contribute to the goal of seeing not only that justice is done, but that it appears to be done." He also quoted former Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis' famous maxim that "sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants." There is an irony to this, noted by Frank Smyth of the Committee to Protect Journalists. Brandeis "made his famous sunlight statement about the need to expose bankers and investors who controlled 'money trusts' to stifle competition, and he later railed against not only powerful corporations but the lawyers and other members of the bar who worked to perpetuate their power."

In a 1905 speech before the Harvard Ethical Society, Brandeis said, "Instead of holding a position of independence, between the wealthy and the people, prepared to curb the excesses of either, able lawyers have, to a large extent, allowed themselves to become adjuncts of great corporations and have neglected the obligation to use their powers for the protection of the people."

Now, more than a century later, Chevron, the third largest corporation in America, according to Forbes magazine, has hauled out their lawyers in a case that would undermine the right of journalists to protect the people by telling them the truth. Joe Berlinger and his legal team have asked Judge Kaplan to suspend his order pending an appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

As the Independent Documentary Association asserts, "This case offers a clear and compelling argument for more vigorous federal shield laws to protect journalists and their work, better federal laws to protect confidential sources, and stronger standards to prevent entities from piercing the journalists' privilege. We urge the higher courts to overturn this ruling to help ensure the safety and protection of journalists and their subjects, and to promote a free and vital press in our nation and around the world."
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