Mysticism in the Modern World

Experiences, questions and discussions on various aspects of mysticism, psychic abilities and psionics.

Mysticism in the Modern World

Postby Sabina » Tue May 31, 2011 5:19 am

There is evidence that in this modern world there is no room left for mysticism. Or perhaps less and less room (after all, there still is the music of the spheres, fibonacci, etc.).
Mystical means having a divine meaning that transcends human understanding. The more we find out and learn, the less it is likely that anything mystical (by that definition) ever happened.

Perhaps you have heard of Nostradamus (Michel de Nostredame), the famous seer from the 16th century?

How about this then...
Recent research suggests that much of his prophetic work paraphrases collections of ancient end-of-the-world prophecies (mainly Bible-based), supplemented with references to historical events and anthologies of omen reports, and then projects those into the future in part with the aid of comparative horoscopy. Hence the many predictions involving ancient figures such as Sulla, Gaius Marius, Nero, and others, as well as his descriptions of "battles in the clouds" and "frogs falling from the sky."

His historical sources include easily identifiable passages from Livy, Suetonius, Plutarch and other classical historians, as well as from medieval chroniclers such as Geoffrey of Villehardouin and Jean Froissart. Many of his astrological references are taken almost word for word from Richard Roussat's Livre de l'estat et mutations des temps of 1549–50.

One of his major prophetic sources was evidently the Mirabilis Liber of 1522, which contained a range of prophecies by Pseudo-Methodius, the Tiburtine Sibyl, Joachim of Fiore, Savonarola and others (his Preface contains 24 biblical quotations, all but two in the order used by Savonarola). This book had enjoyed considerable success in the 1520s, when it went through half a dozen editions (see External links below for facsimiles and translations) but did not sustain its influence, perhaps owing to its mostly Latin text, Gothic script and many difficult abbreviations.

Nostradamus was one of the first to re-paraphrase these prophecies in French, which may explain why they are credited to him. It should be noted that modern views of plagiarism did not apply in the 16th century. Authors frequently copied and paraphrased passages without acknowledgement, especially from the classics.The latest research suggests that he may in fact have used bibliomancy for this—randomly selecting a book of history or prophecy and taking his cue from whatever page it happened to fall open at.

Nostradamus's reliance on historical precedent is reflected in the fact that he explicitly rejected the label prophet (i.e. a person having prophetic powers of his own) on several occasions.
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Re: Mysticism in the Modern World

Postby Rachel » Mon Jun 06, 2011 7:56 pm

Hmm perhaps mysticism has been forced more underground in contemporary society, than in previous days?

I think mysticism and divine connection is always present - whether we as people choose to access it is another matter.
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Re: Mysticism in the Modern World

Postby mirjana » Wed Jun 08, 2011 9:28 pm

Maybe this Osho´s comment about Nostradamus could be also interesting for the title of this topic too.
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Re: Mysticism in the Modern World

Postby Sabina » Fri Jun 10, 2011 9:38 pm

Thanks for adding that Mirjana. That makes absolutely sense and it is a fact that people always find "successful" interpretations after the fact, which, as Osho also pointed out, is not a problem to do with any text that is written in a confusing enough manner.

I have heard people be infatuated with all kinds of things which eventually have a simple explanation and there is no mystery left at all.

Chessa, I myself am attracted to all kinds of mysterious things and there is a need inside me to find the Undiscovered and the Pure. Does it really exist?
I do not know.
It exists in some people perhaps, more than in any "thing".
"Whether You believe you can, or you can't, you are right."
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Re: Mysticism in the Modern World

Postby L1ndy » Sun Jun 12, 2011 4:38 am

The fact that some people are curious and want to know about ideas that can only be held in our minds is in itself mystical. That we can think about the devine is a mystery. I believe that by talking about an idea, we have created it between ourselves and given it energy, that then ripples outward like a stone dropped in pond. As you search for the mysterious and undiscovered, you are creating ripples. Who knows who they will touch? After living more than sixty years, I'm finding more questions and fewer answers, and I'm glad. The questions and the search for the answers have been the most interesting parts of my life, even when I didn't find an answer.
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Re: Mysticism in the Modern World

Postby Rachel » Sun Jun 12, 2011 1:24 pm

I would prefer to believe in the unseen and be disappointed upon my death, than to not believe in the mystical and be rudely shocked.

That sounds awful, doesn't it? haha. ;0) I don't mean it to be awful, just pragmatic.
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Re: Mysticism in the Modern World

Postby mirjana » Sun Jun 12, 2011 4:56 pm

Hi Lindy,
Welcome to DS. =0)
I like your interpretation of mystical. And the part about questions is half a mystery itself.
Hope to hear more from you here.
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