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Etymology of words

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:21 pm
by mirjana
When thinking about etymology there is an eternal question was the word WORD the very first word?
Your thoughts?

Mirjana

Re: Etymology of words

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:32 pm
by Sabina
No, I don't think so.
I would imagine that the very first word was something more practical, more applicable.
If you think of a baby, what are its first words?

That's an interesting question. Try to imagine, to actually picture the situation that brought on the first word. Then describe what exactly happened, describe the scene.
"The Birth of the first word"

It could be fun!
=0)
Shall we make that a separate topic? Should it stay in the Words & Language forum or be in Imagination Exercises?

Sabina

Re: Etymology of words

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:39 pm
by mirjana
I think it could be both, here an there, slightly moderated in the name.

You have already given a nice name for Imagination Exercise: "The Birth of the first word"

And I would use your words that follow as an introduction for this topic there:
"Try to imagine, to actually picture the situation that brought on the first word. Then describe what exactly happened, describe the scene."

For this topic here I would stay by that to find the etymology of the word WORD.

Mirjana

Re: Etymology of words

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:59 pm
by Sabina
Looking up the etymology of the word "word" is easy, but I didn't think that's what you meant with your original question.

Etymology of ~word~
Old English word, meaning "speech, talk, utterance, word," from Proto-Germanic *wurdan (compare Old Scandinavian, Old Frisian. 'word', Dutch 'woord', Old High German and Modern German 'wort', Old Norse 'orð', Gothic 'waurd'), from Proto-Indo-European *were- "speak, say".

As far as I'm concerned this doesn't answer your question, or does it?

Sabina

__4__

Addendum:
Latin for word: verbum
Greek for word: logos

Word Origin & History

logo
1937, probably a shortening of logogram "sign or character representing a word" (1840), from Gk. logos "word" + gram "what is written."

logos
1587, "second person of the Christian Trinity," from Gk. logos "word, speech, discourse," also "reason," from PIE base *leg- "to collect" (with derivatives meaning "to speak," on notion of "to pick out words"); used by Neo-Platonists in various metaphysical and theological senses and picked up by N.T. writers. Other Eng. formations from logos include logolatry "worship of words, unreasonable regard for words or verbal truth" (1810 in Coleridge); logomachy "fighting about words" (1569); logomania (1870); logophobia (1923); and logorrhea (1902).


(I keep expanding this post more and more.. somebody stop me!)


I just came across this article: Your Word: How Powerful!, by Jacqui Neurauter
It is interesting as well.

Re: Etymology of words

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 7:08 pm
by mirjana
Sabina wrote:Looking up the etymology of the word "word" is easy, but I didn't think that's what you meant with your original question.

Etymology of ~word~
Old English word, meaning "speech, talk, utterance, word," from Proto-Germanic *wurdan (compare Old Scandinavian, Old Frisian. 'word', Dutch 'woord', Old High German and Modern German 'wort', Old Norse 'orð', Gothic 'waurd'), from Proto-Indo-European *were- "speak, say".

As far as I'm concerned this doesn't answer your question, or does it?

Sabina


Hi Sabina,

Yes, you are right, but only because I was not precise enough what I am searching for.
This is what is said about word in Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

"A word is the smallest free form (an item that may be uttered in isolation with semantic or pragmatic content) in a language, in contrast to a morpheme, which is the smallest unit of meaning. A word may consist of only one morpheme (e.g. wolf), but a single morpheme may not be able to exist as a free form (e.g. the English plural morpheme -s)."

"Words are fundamental units of inherent quality or basic constitution of things. A word is a substantive expression of pictures in the mind. Words are carriages, representations, evidence of the search of essence and meaning. Words are vehicles, containers of thoughts, emotions, ideas and knowledge. The meaning of a word is “a speech sound or series of speech sounds that communicates a meaning, also, a graphic representation of such a sound or series of sounds.” Webster’s New Explorer Dictionary. Merriam-Webster Incorp. Springfield, Massachusetts. 1999.

John Locke wrote that the use of words “is to be sensible marks of ideas.
Wittgenstein’s thought transitioned from a word as representation of meaning to “the meaning of a word is its use in the language.”
Creations of words
"Communication through movement, utterance, carvings of figures, sticks, letters and impressions in wood, earth, stone, metal, paper and computer software shape, construct and express meaning of a word. Since ancient times, man has created words through gestures, speech and symbols."

Consistence of word
"Typically, a word will consist of a root or stem, and zero or more affixes. Words can be combined to create other units of language, such as phrases, clauses, and/or sentences. A word consisting of two or more stems joined together form a compound. A word combined with an already existing word or part of a word form a portmanteau."


After the first something was expressed by sound of our mouth, then people came to the idea to name those sounds by the name word. So, if the word WORD was an egg, who or what was the hen?
That was actually my question to which, I can imagine, is not possible to give the answer.

Maybe this could simply be a nice place to learn and talk about the word WORD and share our discoveries in that subject.
Your thoughts?


Mirjana

Re: Etymology of words

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 7:30 pm
by pineal
Sabina wrote: from Proto-Indo-European *were- "speak, say".[/color]

As far as I'm concerned this doesn't answer your question, or does it?

Sabina

Vak Is the Sanskrit for Speak in general. It could be any meaningful utterance. May be that is the origin of Proto-Indo-European.

Congratulations Sabina, on the launching of New Web Forum.

With Love

Pineal

Re: Etymology of words

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 7:55 pm
by Sabina
Thank you Pineal,

It's so nice to see you here, welcome!
Of course considering the Sanskrit roots is most important. Sumerian and Egyptian should probably be considered as well.
What are your thoughts on the origin of the word "word" or how the first word came to be?

mirjana wrote:Maybe this could simply be a nice place to learn and talk about the word WORD and share our discoveries in that subject.
Your thoughts?

There is definitely no harm in that, in fact, I believe we have already begun doing just that.
:)

Sabina

Re: Etymology of words

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:49 pm
by mirjana
pineal wrote:...

Congratulations Sabina, on the launching of New Web Forum.

With Love

Pineal

Hi Pineal,

Welcome to Deep Spirits. *WAVE*
As one of the members said: "Deep Spirits attracts deep spirits". I like that. =0)
As I have recently read your words about future and liked them very much, it would be nice to see them among Deep Spirits Quotes: http://www.deepspirits.com/exploration/quotes-by-deep-spirits-t15.html

Mirjana

Re: Etymology of words

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 6:11 pm
by pineal
Thank You for your welcome Mirjana & Sabina.

With Love

Pineal

Re: Etymology of words

PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:50 am
by Heidi
If you are looking for the first Word or Logos, as it is described in the Bible and other Holy Books, they say that it is the Creating Force, the Audible Life Stream or the Music of the Spheres that has created all that is.

Mystics say that it is a sound that we can come in touch with if we follow certain practices.