Brooksonian Hypnosis

Metaphysical, spiritual, philosophical or mystical topics.
The forum for talks about the intangible universe, the human mind, and the soul.

Brooksonian Hypnosis

Postby stephenbrooks21 » Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:16 am

When two people meet for the first time they know nothing about one another.

It is the therapist's job to ask questions and start things rolling. Initially this may be difficult. So it is important that the therapist ask open ended questions to evoke information based answers. These questions cannot be answered with a yes or no. They usually start with who, what, where, how, when etc. Questions such as "Why did you decide to see me?" will evoke a response that contains information. This information can be used to help understand the Patient's problem and to build rapport later. You can build rapport by re-capping on the information shared and reflecting back your own understanding of the Patient's problem.

A Patient needs to trust the therapist before he shares information of a personal nature. One way of developing this trust is for the therapist to share something of himself in an informal and friendly way. If this information contains references to interests that are also enjoyed or shared by the Patient rapport will develop because of the common shared experience. It is unwise to share information about any problems the therapist may have as this will reduce the confidence the Patient has in the therapist. However if the therapist shares how he was able to overcome a problem this may be therapeutic.
stephenbrooks21
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2012 8:57 am
Favorite book: about hypnosis
Favorite movie: spirituality
Things I like: hypnotherapy
State of Mind or Tendency: Neutral
Kudos: 0

Re: Brooksonian Hypnosis

Postby mirjana » Wed Apr 11, 2012 11:45 am

stephenbrooks21 wrote:When two people meet for the first time they know nothing about one another.

It is the therapist's job to ask questions and start things rolling. Initially this may be difficult. So it is important that the therapist ask open ended questions to evoke information based answers. These questions cannot be answered with a yes or no. They usually start with who, what, where, how, when etc. Questions such as "Why did you decide to see me?" will evoke a response that contains information. This information can be used to help understand the Patient's problem and to build rapport later. You can build rapport by re-capping on the information shared and reflecting back your own understanding of the Patient's problem.

A Patient needs to trust the therapist before he shares information of a personal nature. One way of developing this trust is for the therapist to share something of himself in an informal and friendly way. If this information contains references to interests that are also enjoyed or shared by the Patient rapport will develop because of the common shared experience. It is unwise to share information about any problems the therapist may have as this will reduce the confidence the Patient has in the therapist. However if the therapist shares how he was able to overcome a problem this may be therapeutic.

Hi stephenbrooks21,
Welcome to DS =0)
You gave as an interesting comment from the point of view of your favorite readings.
As this description could mostly be interesting for those who are patients or therapist, I would use the bolded part of your text in order to ask the following question:
Is it unwise to share any information like we do it here before putting it in the context of personal experience or not? What is the difference?
User avatar
mirjana
 
Posts: 1614
Joined: Mon Dec 21, 2009 4:09 pm
State of Mind or Tendency: Inspired
Kudos: 48


Return to Spirited Debate

Who is online

Registered users: Yahoo [Bot]

cron
StumbleUpon Digg Delicious Reddit Yahoo Google Live Facebook Twitter MySpace